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Days Until The 2019 Hurricane Season
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2019 Hurricane Season Names:
Andrea Barry Chantal Dean Erin Fernand Gabrielle Humberto Imelda Jerry Karen Lorenzo Melissa Nestor Olga Pablo Rebekah Sebastien Tanya Van Wendy

Final Updated 2018 Cyclone Tracks

2017 Tropical Cyclone Tracks

Current Tropics Activity

Tropical cyclone formation is not expected during the next 5 days.

Remember when you're preparing for a storm: Run from the water; hide from the wind!

Hurricane Supplies

TrackTheTropics Resource Links

Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale
Category Wind Speed Storm Surge
  mph ft
5 ≥157 >18
4 130–156 13–18
3 111–129 9–12
2 96–110 6–8
1 74–95 4–5
Additional Classifications
Tropical Storm 39–73 0–3
Tropical Depression 0–38 0
The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a classification used for most Western Hemisphere tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of "tropical depressions" and "tropical storms", and thereby become hurricanes. Source: Intellicast

Beaufort Wind Scale

Number Of Storms Per 100 Yrs

Atlantic Basin Storm Count Since 1850


Atlantic Basin Storm Count Since 1850

Hurricane Strike Percentages


[Map of return period in years for hurricanes passing within 50 nautical miles] Estimated return period in years for hurricanes passing within 50 nautical miles of various locations on the U.S. Coast


[Map of return period in years for major hurricanes passing within 50 nautical miles] Estimated return period in years for major hurricanes passing within 50 nautical miles of various locations on the U.S. Coast


CONUS Hurricane Strikes

 
[Map of 1950-2011 CONUS Hurricane Strikes] 1950-2011 CONUS Hurricane Strikes (Courtesy of NCDC)

Lookup Historic Hurricane Tracks



Hurricane Katrina Track 2005

Typical Tropical Cyclone Origins and Track By Month



June Hurricane Climatology

July Hurricane Climatology

August Hurricane Climatology

September Hurricane Climatology

October Hurricane Climatology

November Hurricane Climatology

Hurricane Season 2018

Track The Tropics is the #1 source to track the tropics 24/7 and keep up to date on any potential threats to land during the Atlantic Hurricane Season! Hurricane Season 2018 starts on June 1st and ends on November 30th. Love Spaghetti Models? Well you’ve come to the right place!!

*2018 Hurricane Season Officially Ends*

2 Day Tropical Weather OutlookAtlantic 2 Day GTWO graphic

5 Day Tropical Weather OutlookAtlantic 5 Day GTWO graphic

Tropical Cyclone Formation Probabilities

00Z Runs of TC Genesis Probability
NCEP 0-120 Hours

Multi Model NCEP, CMC, ECMWF 0-120 Hours

12Z Runs of TC Genesis Probability
NCEP 0-120 Hours

Multi Model NCEP, CMC, ECMWF 0-120 Hours

VIEW ALL TC PROBABILITY RUNS

Hurricane Season 2018 Graphical Marine Forecast
Current Marine Forecast

Current Tropical Surface Analysis Maps

Tropical Atlantic
Current Tropical Atlantic Analysis

Southwest Atlantic
Current Southwest Atlantic Analysis

Gulf of Mexico
Current Gulf of Mexico Analysis
Gulf Buoy Data
Current Gulf of Mexico Buoy Data

Southeast US Coast
Current Southeast US Coast Analysis
Southeast Coast Buoy Data
Current Southeast US Coast Buoy Data

Caribbean
Current Caribbean Analysis
Caribbean Buoy Data
Current Caribbean Buoy Data

Hurricane Season 101

The official Atlantic Basin Hurricane Season runs from June 1st to November 30th.

A tropical cyclone is a warm-core, low pressure system without any “front” attached. It develops over tropical or subtropical waters, and has an organized circulation. Depending upon location, tropical cyclones have different names around the world. The Tropical Cyclones we track in the Atlantic basin are called Tropical Depressions, Tropical Storms and Hurricanes!

Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones are classified as follows:

Tropical Depression: Organized system of clouds and thunderstorms with defined surface circulation and max sustained winds of 38 mph or less.

Tropical Storm: Organized system of strong thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 39-73 mph.

Hurricane: Intense tropical weather system of strong thunderstorms with a well-defined surface circulation. A Hurricane has max sustained winds of 74 mph or higher!

The difference between Tropical Storm and Hurricane Watches, Warnings, Advisories and Outlooks

Warnings:Listen closely to instructions from local officials on TV, radio, cell phones or other computers for instructions from local officials.Evacuate immediately if told to do so.

  • Storm Surge Warning: There is a danger of life-threatening inundation from rising water moving inland from the shoreline somewhere within the specified area. This is generally within 36 hours. If you are under a storm surge warning, check for evacuation orders from your local officials.
  • Hurricane Warning: Hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or greater) are expected somewhere within the specified area. NHC issues a hurricane warning 36 hours in advance of tropical storm-force winds to give you time to complete your preparations. All preparations should be complete. Evacuate immediately if so ordered.
  • Tropical Storm Warning: Tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are expected within your area within 36 hours.
  • Extreme Wind Warning: Extreme sustained winds of a major hurricane (115 mph or greater), usually associated with the eyewall, are expected to begin within an hour. Take immediate shelter in the interior portion of a well-built structure.

Please note that hurricane and tropical storm watches and warnings for winds on land as well as storm surge watches and warnings can be issued for storms that the NWS believes will become tropical cyclones but have not yet attained all of the characteristics of a tropical cyclone (i.e., a closed low-level circulation, sustained thunderstorm activity, etc.). In these cases, the forecast conditions on land warrant alerting the public. These storms are referred to as “potential tropical cyclones” by the NWS.
Hurricane, tropical storm, and storm surge watches and warnings can also be issued for storms that have lost some or all of their tropical cyclone characteristics, but continue to produce dangerous conditions. These storms are called “post-tropical cyclones” by the NWS.

Watches: Listen closely to instructions from local officials on TV, radio, cell phones or other computers for instructions from local officials. Evacuate if told to do so.

  • Storm Surge Watch: Storm here is a possibility of life-threatening inundation from rising water moving inland from the shoreline somewhere within the specified area, generally within 48 hours. If you are under a storm surge watch, check for evacuation orders from your local officials.
  • Hurricane Watch: Huriricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or greater) are possible within your area. Because it may not be safe to prepare for a hurricane once winds reach tropical storm force, The NHC issues hurricane watches 48 hours before it anticipates tropical storm-force winds.
  • Tropical Storm Watch: Tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are possible within the specified area within 48 hours.

Advisories:

  • Tropical Cyclone Public Advisory:The Tropical Cyclone Public Advisory contains a list of all current coastal watches and warnings associated with an ongoing or potential tropical cyclone, a post-tropical cyclone, or a subtropical cyclone. It also provides the cyclone position, maximum sustained winds, current motion, and a description of the hazards associated with the storm.
  • Tropical Cyclone Track Forecast Cone:This graphic shows areas under tropical storm and hurricane watches and warnings, the current position of the center of the storm, and its predicted track. Forecast uncertainty is conveyed on the graphic by a “cone” (white and stippled areas) drawn such that the center of the storm will remain within the cone about 60 to 70 percent of the time. Remember, the effects of a tropical cyclone can span hundreds of miles. Areas well outside of the cone often experience hazards such as tornadoes or inland flooding from heavy rain.

Outlooks:

  • Tropical Weather Outlook:The Tropical Weather Outlook is a discussion of significant areas of disturbed weather and their potential for development during the next 5 days. The Outlook includes a categorical forecast of the probability of tropical cyclone formation during the first 48 hours and during the entire 5-day forecast period. You can also find graphical versions of the 2-day and 5-day Outlook here

***Be sure to read up on tons of more information on Hurricane knowledge, preparedness, statistics and history under the menu on the left hand side of the page!***

Here are your 2019 Hurricane Season Names: Andrea, Barry, Chantal, Dean, Erin, Fernand, Gabrielle, Humberto, Imelda, Jerry, Karen, Lorenzo, Melissa, Nestor, Olga, Pablo, Rebekah, Sebastien, Tanya, Van and Wendy!!!

General Weather Tweets

Areas in eastern North Carolina and northeastern South Carolina, which were hard hit a few months ago by Hurricane Florence are among the communities dealing with flooded rivers: https://t.co/eiCn1oqcWm

After losing 4 out 4 #fantasyfootball matchups to get to the championships because of poor performances and brutal early game injuries

From the late week eastern storm a couple thoughts: Florida has a chance to chip away at its southern drought, but will likely face a couple days of SEVERE weather on Wednesday and Thursday. SPC has outlooked day 4 area Thursday which could be a bigger day.

Commuters in Maine, including around Portland, will need to watch out for slick, snow-covered roads this morning: https://t.co/q9f6LB35D8

Evolution of eastern late week soaker starts with the two systems in the west this morning. Watch how deep the trof in the east gets (red bowl), closes off, slows, and then lifts north. Not a lot of cold with this so snow is tricky and will be late in its life toward the wknd.

After a snowless December thus far per @HeatherZWeather the Portland Jetport has picked up 3.6" of snow this morning.

A major storm could lead to widespread travel headaches in the eastern U.S. late this week: https://t.co/STkZ3NYFtg

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Gulf / East Coast Radar Loops

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Tropical Intensity Index


Wind Shear

Favorable Conditions for Development


12 Hour Forecast 12 Hour Favorable Conditions for Tropical Development Forecast

24 Hour Forecast 24 Hour Favorable Conditions for Tropical Development Forecast

48 Hour Forecast 48 Hour Favorable Conditions for Tropical Development Forecast

72 Hour Forecast 72 Hour Favorable Conditions for Tropical Development Forecast

Saharan Air Layer (Dry Air)

Saharan Air Layer (SAL)
Saharan Air Layer (SAL)

Global Jet Stream & 250 mb

Vertical Wind Shear

Current Sea Surface Tempatures


Sea Surface Temps
Sea Surface Temps

Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly


Sea Surface Temperature Analomy
Sea Surface Temps Anomaly

Tropical Cyclone Heat Potential

Wind Shear
Wind Shear
Tropical Cyclone Heat Potential

Current Wind Shear


Wind Shear
Wind Shear

Shear Tendency Past 24 Hours


Wind Shear

Future Shear Forecasts


24 hour Future Wind Shear

48 hour Future Wind Shear

72 hour Future Wind Shear

Vertical Wind Shear

Vertical Wind Shear
Vertical Wind Shear

Current Wind Direction

ASCAT Data (Ascending/Descending)


Ascending ASCAT

Descending ASCAT

Future Surface Analysis Forecasts


24 Hour NHC Forecast 24 Hour NHC Surface Analysis Forecast

48 Hour NHC Forecast 48 Hour NHC Surface Analysis Forecast

72 Hour NHC Forecast 72 Hour NHC Surface Analysis Forecast

Atlantic Sea Height / Waves

Atlantic Sea Height / Waves
Atlantic Sea Height / Waves
Atlantic Sea Height / Waves