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Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale
CategoryWind SpeedStorm Surge
 mphft
5≥157>18
4130–15613–18
3111–1299–12
296–1106–8
174–954–5
Additional Classifications
Tropical Storm39–730–3
Tropical Depression0–380
The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a classification used for most Western Hemisphere tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of "tropical depressions" and "tropical storms", and thereby become hurricanes. Source: Intellicast

Beaufort Wind Scale

Number Of Storms Per 100 Yrs

00Z Runs of TC Genesis Probability Ensemble-based Probability (%) of TC Genesis Consensus (NCEP, CMC and ECMWF) 0-48 Hours 0-120 Hours 120-240 Hours Ensemble-based Probability (%) of TC Genesis Consensus (NCEP) 0-48 Hours 0-120 Hours 120-240 Hours 12Z Runs of TC Genesis Probability Ensemble-based Probability (%) of TC Genesis Consensus (NCEP, CMC and ECMWF) 0-48 Hours 0-120 Hours 120-240 Hours Ensemble-based Probability (%) of TC Genesis Consensus (NCEP) 0-48 Hours 0-120 Hours 120-240 Hours

Atlantic Basin Storm Count Since 1850


Atlantic Basin Storm Count Since 1850

Hurricane Strike Percentages

[Map of return period in years for hurricanes passing within 50 nautical miles]
Estimated return period in years for hurricanes passing within 50 nautical miles of various locations on the U.S. Coast
[Map of return period in years for major hurricanes passing within 50 nautical miles]
Estimated return period in years for MAJOR passing within 50 nautical miles of various locations on the U.S. Coast

CONUS Hurricane Strikes

1950-2017
[Map of 1950-2017 CONUS Hurricane Strikes]
Total Hurricane Strikes 1900-2010 Total Hurricane Strikes 1900-2010 Total MAJOR Hurricane Strikes 1900-2010 Total Major Hurricane Strikes 1900-2010Western Gulf Hurricane Strikes Western Gulf Hurricane Strikes Western Gulf MAJOR Hurricane Strikes Western Gulf Major Hurricane StrikesEastern Gulf Hurricane Strikes Eastern Gulf Hurricane Strikes Eastern Gulf MAJOR Hurricane Strikes Eastern Gulf Major Hurricane StrikesSE Coast Hurricane Strikes SE Coast Hurricane Strikes SE Coast MAJOR Hurricane Strikes SE Coast Major Hurricane StrikesNE Coast Hurricane Strikes NE Coast Hurricane Strikes NE Coast MAJOR Hurricane Strikes NE Coast Major Hurricane Strikes

Lookup Historic Hurricane Tracks

Hurricane Katrina Track 2005

Typical Tropical Cyclone Origins and Tracks by Month

June
June Hurricane Climatology July
July Hurricane Climatology August
August Hurricane Climatology September
September Hurricane Climatology October
October Hurricane Climatology November
November Hurricane Climatology

Tropical Storm Omar Archive – 2020 Hurricane Season

Tropical storm Omar (SSHWS)
Omar 2020-09-01 1735Z.jpg Omar 2020 track.png
DurationAugust 31 – September 5
Peak intensity40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)  1003 mbar (hPa)

In the last few days of August, a cold front spawned a trough over Northern Florida and eventually a low-pressure area formed offshore of the southeast coast of the United States. The low rapidly organized as it drifted on top of the Gulf Stream, and was classified as Tropical Depression Fifteen at 21:00 UTC on August 31.[201] Moving generally northeastward away from North Carolina, the depression struggled to intensify in a marginally favorable environment with warm Gulf Stream waters being offset by high wind shear.[202] Eventually, satellite estimates revealed that the depression was intensifying and the system became consolidated enough to be upgraded to a tropical storm and as a result was given the name Omar at 21:00 UTC on September 1.[203] This event marked the earliest formation of the fifteenth named storm on record in the North Atlantic, exceeding the record of Hurricane Ophelia in 2005 by approximately six days.[203] After maintaining its intensity for 24 hours, northwesterly wind shear of 50 knots weakened the storm back to a tropical depression.[204][205] Although wind shear continued to plague the system, Omar managed to remain a tropical cyclone.[206] Early on September 4, Omar fell to 30 mph amid the wind shear, and despite repeated forecasts for Omar to weaken further into a remnant low, Omar restrengthened back to 35 mph 12 hours later.[207][208] Early on September 5, Omar made a jog to the north; however, the center began to fully separate from the bursts of convection, and at 21:00 UTC that day, Omar degenerated into a remnant low.[209][210] The low moved northeastward, reaching Scotland on September 9.

While still a depression moving away from the United States, the storm brought life-threatening rip currents and swells to the coast of the Carolinas.[211]