Days Left Hurricane Season 2017
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Thank you to Tropical Tidbits for a lot of the graphics we use on current storms and invests on this website. Please be sure to visit Tropical Tidbits for tons of more tools on tracking the Tropics!
Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale
Category Wind Speed Storm Surge
  mph ft
5 ≥157 >18
4 130–156 13–18
3 111–129 9–12
2 96–110 6–8
1 74–95 4–5
Additional Classifications
Tropical Storm 39–73 0–3
Tropical Depression 0–38 0
The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a classification used for most Western Hemisphere tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of "tropical depressions" and "tropical storms", and thereby become hurricanes. Source: Intellicast

Beaufort Wind Scale

Number Of Storms Per 100 Yrs

Atlantic Basin Storm Count Since 1850


Atlantic Basin Storm Count Since 1850

Typical Tropical Cyclone Origins and Track By Month



June Hurricane Climatology

July Hurricane Climatology

August Hurricane Climatology

September Hurricane Climatology

October Hurricane Climatology

November Hurricane Climatology

Hurricane Strike Percentages


[Map of return period in years for hurricanes passing within 50 nautical miles] Estimated return period in years for hurricanes passing within 50 nautical miles of various locations on the U.S. Coast


[Map of return period in years for major hurricanes passing within 50 nautical miles] Estimated return period in years for major hurricanes passing within 50 nautical miles of various locations on the U.S. Coast


CONUS Hurricane Strikes

 
[Map of 1950-2011 CONUS Hurricane Strikes] 1950-2011 CONUS Hurricane Strikes (Courtesy of NCDC)

Lookup Historic Hurricane Tracks



Hurricane Katrina Track 2005

Current Wind Direction and Layer Mean Wind Steering

Current Wind Direction

Lower Level Winds
Lower Level Winds

Upper Level Winds
Upper Level Winds

Layer mean wind steering maps will give you vital information on the direction Tropical Cyclones are possibly going to take based on their current intensity. Check out the current Atlantic mean wind steering maps below…

These wind analyses depict the environmental flow in various oceanic basins for selected tropospheric layer-means. Based on previous studies, the depth of this layer is correlated with the TC steering layer, and generally increases with increasing TC intensity. These layer-mean steering fields are created by mass-weighting mandatory-level, high-resolution wind analyses derived locally at UW-CIMSS using a three-dimensional recursive filter technique. These analyses are strongly influenced by high-density, multispectral satellite-derived wind information. Data from NWP global models provide background field information for each analysis run. Source: CIMSS

So just to give you an idea a very weak Tropical Cyclone will follow the flow steered by the lower level winds (Example 700-850mb) and a very strong Tropical Cyclone would follow the flow steered by the higher level winds (Example 200-850mb). Of course mean layer wind steering is not the only factor in forecasting Tropical Cyclone direction.

Mean Wind Steering 200-700mb

TC MSLP/Vmax: <940mb/>122kts

200-700mb Wind Steering

 

250-850mb

TC MSLP/Vmax: 940-949mb/112-122kts

250-850mb Wind Steering

 

300-850mb

TC MSLP/Vmax: 950-969mb/90-112kts

300-850mb Wind Steering

 

400-850mb

TC MSLP/Vmax: 970-989mb/60-90kts

400-850mb Wind Steering

 

500-850mb

TC MSLP/Vmax: 990-999mb/45-60kts

500-850mb Wind Steering

 

700-850mb

TC MSLP/Vmax: >1000mb/<45kts

700-850mb Wind Steering

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